Album Review: Turrentine Jones – Our Days

Turrentine Jones
Our Days
Release Date: 11th August 2014

Manchester trio Turrentine Jones have been on my radar as a band to keep an eye on since they messaged me on Twitter a couple of months ago. Since then I wrote a new music about them [which you can check out here] and was kept in the loop when it came to album release time which is lovely of the band and their press team to give me access to the album before its release to review it.

We start with the wonderfully titled ‘Gift Of A Rose’ who’s jazz influenced bass line and echoing guitar strums brings us into this one instantly giving us a great rhythm when paired with a steady drum. The vocals have a swagger about them sung with a nonchalant attitude and an indie rock tone reminiscent of the best of the 90’s. The slower almost sassy rhythm mashed with the prominent organ gives for a great opening to this debut.

Quick drums create a great rhythm for swaying your hips on the short but sweet ‘Hunger’ while the vocals are an interesting mix of early 90’s Brit pop and the unique classic rock influenced tones of someone like Miles Kane. Whereas next track ‘Love Heard You Coming’ with oriental sounding organ, guitar chords and that hard to ignore voice gives a fresher take on the indie rock scene of late. Also found here is the lyric “love is a trap door and I’ve seen you fall through before” which is probably one of my favourite lyrics I’ve heard this year with its quite accurate description of love.

‘Grace Is A Dancer’ builds from gentle beginnings of with the church organ tones and softly strummed guitar to a steady acoustic melody that backs up the prominent and authoritative vocal before the simpler first half changes completely including rock fuelled riffs, a hard hit drum and shouted vocals full of emotion. Single ‘Moonlight Is On Yer Side’ is all drums, cymbals, spiky guitar strums and smooth vocals that retain their swagger flowing perfectly from one word to the next. Old school indie mixing wonderfully with classic rock sounds to produce a track catchy but not obviously so and definitely the obvious choice for their first single.

Intricate guitar holds up demanding organ and a vocal ranging from deep and full of confidence to higher and more harmonious on ‘Pussy Cat’ while the chorus of repeated lyrics and catchy guitar melody makes this an earworm in the making while simplistic lyrics and flowing smooth harmonies of ‘June’ take the best bits from bygone eras and reimagines them making a modern day indie track with a nostalgic tone.

Acoustic strummed guitar opens ‘Little Queen’ adding vocals with an added country edge, from the voice to the guitar to the execution of the lyrics this one has a really country music twang to the indie/rock and roll found throughout the rest of the album. It is not something that is overly played though just adding a slight hint to their so far successful sound.

Deep bass and gentle guitar brings us into the closing track on the album ‘Mary Ann’, the vocals address the mysterious Mary with a tone that ranges from soft and slightly emotional to harsh and commanding. Choruses are faster and louder with the organ that reverberates around the track and quick, pounding drum all set against drawn out shouts of ‘Mary’ repeated over and over.

As debut albums go, this is a very impressive one. I was instantly taken with their sound before but for this album it seems like the band have really stepped up a gear to produce something that really is excellent and worthy of a listen from you all.

To find out more about Turrentine Jones visit their website, their Facebook page, their Soundcloud page, their YouTube page or you can follow them on Twitter – @turrentinejones

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s